Cyan’s Fiction

Not to be outdone by a swathe of reimagined classics that have become all the rage in recent years, Volvo-affiliated triple World Touring Car Champions, Cyan Racing, have now released one of their own. Behold the stunning Volvo P1800 Cyan.

The Volvo P1800 Cyan is the result of an advanced engineering process, involving many of the same talents who designed, built and developed our world title winning Volvo S60 TC1

Cyan Racing, the reigning triple World Touring Car Champions, has revealed the Volvo P1800 Cyan, an interpretation of the iconic Volvo sports car from the sixties.  

If you’re unfamiliar with the original Volvo P1800 because it might be easy to underestimate this car’s significance, so here’s a quick history lesson: Unveiled in 1960, a year before Jaguar impressed with the E-Type, two years before the Ferrari 250 GTO and three years before the Porsche 911, the Volvo P1800 was marketed more as a touring car rather than a sportscars like those British, Italian or German brands with racing pedigree to match. That didn’t stop Roger Moore driving it in the hit television show, The Saint, and believe it or or not, with mechanicals from the sturdy Volvo Amazon/122 series, it was surprisingly dependable. 

Inspired by the continuation of the Ferrari, Jaguar and Porsche model lines, Cyan Racing (formerly Polestar) CEO, Christian Dahl, wanted to bring a reimagined Volvo P1800 to life in the modern age. But with a focus on driver engagement they haven’t used all of the latest technology they could have. In the age of autonomous driving, electrification and connectivity, Cyan Racing decided it was time to capture what has been and to make it timeless. 

Obviously we could have built an electric Volvo P1800 filled with all the latest technology, comfort and luxury. But that was not what we wanted. Amid this paradigm shift we decided to slow down time and freeze a part of it in our own time capsule. To take the best from the golden sixties and combine it with our capabilities of today, keeping a pure yet refined driving experience.

— Christian Dahl, Cyan Racing

While creating the Volvo P1800 Cyan, the team behind it decided to treat the design and engineering of the sixties with care, moving it forward in a delicate way. 

"We decided to apply our expertise in engine, aero and chassis design for a car that delivers on the Cyan engineering philosophy in terms of predictability and intuitive driver control, yet keeping the light-weight, analogue driving experience of the sixties," said Mattias Evensson, Project Manager and Head of Engineering at Cyan Racing. 

There are no driver aids to distort the driving experience, meaning no stability control, ABS or brake booster. 

"The Volvo P1800 Cyan is about clearing away anything disturbing the direct connection between driver, tyres and the road. Our objective has been to keep that undisturbed sensation whilst refining it with the best technology of today," said Mattias Evensson. 

“To put together an interpretation of an iconic design is a challenge. I think we succeeded in merging new technology without losing the character of the original Volvo P1800,” said Ola Granlund, Head of Design at Cyan Racing. 

The Volvo P1800 Cyan started life as a 1964 Volvo P1800 that has been refined and reinforced utilising high-strength steel and carbon fibre. 

“The basis for a precise and intuitive driving experience is a solid body structure. Cars from the sixties are far from ideal when it comes to this due to weak points and steel quality that allow for flex,” said Mattias Evensson. 

The Volvo P1800 body has been altered to accommodate a wider track, larger wheels and repositioned greenhouse, among a long list of redesigns. 

“We have redesigned the structure of the original shape and strengthened weak points in the chassis through triangulation, using high-strength steel and integrated the carbon fibre body with the chassis structure. 

“The carbon fibre is not just a fine shell of separate panels, but rather structural components joined with high-strength adhesive to the steel. All parts of the carbon fibre are adding to the structural rigidity.” 

This process is a key part to enable low weight and high responsiveness, with the car weighing just 990 kilos. 

The two-litre turbocharged four-cylinder engine is based on the same engine as used in the world title-winning Volvo S60 TC1 race car, producing 420 horsepower and 455Nm of torque, with a redline at 7700 rpm. 

The end result is suitably stunning and impresses from behind the wheel as well. 

“We are really satisfied with the level of grip and precision that we have achieved from the chassis in combination with a responsive steering,” said Thed Björk, development driver and 2017 touring car world champion for Cyan Racing. 

“The car goes where you point it. You can be brutal going into a corner and still find your apex and exit within millimetres. 

“The settings of the car are not aimed at fast lap times but rather to deliver an enjoyable and exciting driving experience. I feel my smile widening each time that I control the drift angle of the car through a long turn.” 

ENDS 

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